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LATEST NEWS

Meeting Gorbachev - Spring Films

09th May, 2018

Meeting Gorbachev had a great summer of film festivals this year, it will be distributed by A+E Network.

Feature documentary “Meeting Gorbachev” by legendary filmmaker Werner Herzog and Emmy Award winning Director, André Singer.

OnSight were delighted to provide full 4K Post Production for this important feature film.

" Even for Werner Herzog, but especially for me, to tackle one of the greatest figures of the 20th Century for our film "Meeting Gorbachev" was both daunting and challenging.  Relying on the skill-set of Onsight for the whole post-production process was not only essential, contributing to the global success of the film, but (hugely important) was enjoyable too.  This is a post-production team at the top of their game"

The film is Werner Herzog and Mikhail Gorbachev in a conversation about history, the fall of the Soviet Union and the future of Russia  embellished with black Herzogian humour.

Produced by Spring Films and Werner Herzog Film for History Films, A&E Indie Films and MDR/ARTE.  Producers are Lucki Stipetic and Svetlana Palmer. It was Directed by André Singer and Werner Herzog and Edited by Michael Ellis.  Richard Melman is the Executive Producer, Ulrich Brochhagen is the Executive Producer for MDR/ARTE and Molly Thompson is Executive Producer for History Films.

With his distinctive voice and his penchant for the more absurd sides of humanity, Werner Herzog is an unparalleled narrator. But in Meeting Gorbachev he is in for a fight to the finish. Herzog's conversations with the 87-year-old former head of state is epic in scope, but has a keen eye for history's small details. The greatness and fall of the Soviet Union, the Cold War, the future of Russia  the ageing Gorbachev's political insight is as profound as his trust in the individual. We are reminded of how things could have turned out with this vast country. As any good Marxist knows, history is just a byword for struggle and conflict, but Gorbachev looks forward towards a possible future with peace. Herzog himself contributes his own analyses of archive material from the Soviet era, where he with black humour and a sharp eye finds the most interesting details in the midst of all the confusion. And, paradoxically, it is these details that end up being decisive.